martes, 25 de octubre de 2016

Percy Bysshe Shelley - Ozymandias

       

Percy Bysshe Shelley - Ozymandias


I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said:—Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown

And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things,
The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed.

And on the pedestal these words appear:
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!"

Nothing beside remains: round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away.



Percy Bysshe Shelley - Ozymandias (PT)


Eu encontrei um viajante de uma terra antiga
Que disse:—Duas gigantescas pernas de pedra sem torso
Erguem-se no deserto. Perto delas na areia,
Meio afundada, jaz um rosto partido, cuja expressão

E lábios franzidos e escárnio de frieza no comando
Dizem que seu escultor bem aquelas paixões leu
Que ainda sobrevivem, estampadas nessas partes sem vida,
A mão que os zombava e o coração que os alimentava.

E no pedestal estas palavras aparecem:
"Meu nome é Ozymandias, rei dos reis:
Contemplem minhas obras, ó poderosos, e desesperai-vos!"

Nada resta: junto à decadência
Das ruínas colossais, ilimitadas e nuas
As areias solitárias e inacabáveis estendem-se à distância.

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792—1822)

foi um dos mais importantes poetas românticos ingleses.




Conteúdo completo disponível em:







Robert-Frost-The-Wood-pile

Robert Frost - The Wood-pile

Out walking in the frozen swamp one gray day, 
I paused and said, 'I will turn back from here. 
No, I will go on farther—and we shall see.' 
The hard snow held me, save where now and then 
One foot went through. The view was all in lines 
Straight up and down of tall slim trees 
Too much alike to mark or name a place by 
So as to say for certain I was here 
Or somewhere else: I was just far from home. 
A small bird flew before me. He was careful 
To put a tree between us when he lighted, 
And say no word to tell me who he was 
Who was so foolish as to think what he thought. 
He thought that I was after him for a feather— 
The white one in his tail; like one who takes 
Everything said as personal to himself. 
One flight out sideways would have undeceived him. 
And then there was a pile of wood for which 
I forgot him and let his little fear 
Carry him off the way I might have gone, 
Without so much as wishing him good-night. 
He went behind it to make his last stand. 
It was a cord of maple, cut and split 
And piled—and measured, four by four by eight. 
And not another like it could I see. 
No runner tracks in this year's snow looped near it. 
And it was older sure than this year's cutting, 
Or even last year's or the year's before. 
The wood was gray and the bark warping off it 
And the pile somewhat sunken. Clematis 
Had wound strings round and round it like a bundle. 
What held it though on one side was a tree 
Still growing, and on one a stake and prop, 
These latter about to fall. I thought that only 
Someone who lived in turning to fresh tasks 
Could so forget his handiwork on which 
He spent himself, the labor of his ax, 
And leave it there far from a useful fireplace 
To warm the frozen swamp as best it could 
With the slow smokeless burning of decay. 












Carl-Sandburg-Windflower-Leaf

Carl Sandburg - Windflower Leaf

This flower is repeated
out of old winds, out of
old times.

The wind repeats these, it
must have these, over and
over again.

Oh, windflowers so fresh,
Oh, beautiful leaves, here
now again.

The domes over
fall to pieces.
The stones under
fall to pieces.
Rain and ice
wreck the works.
The wind keeps, the windflowers
keep, the leaves last,
The wind young and strong lets
these last longer than stones. 














William-Wordsworth-We-are-Seven

William Wordsworth - We are Seven

———A simple Child, 
That lightly draws its breath, 
And feels its life in every limb, 
What should it know of death? 

I met a little cottage Girl: 
She was eight years old, she said; 
Her hair was thick with many a curl 
That clustered round her head. 

She had a rustic, woodland air, 
And she was wildly clad: 
Her eyes were fair, and very fair; 
—Her beauty made me glad. 

“Sisters and brothers, little Maid, 
How many may you be?” 
“How many? Seven in all,” she said, 
And wondering looked at me. 

“And where are they? I pray you tell.” 
She answered, “Seven are we; 
And two of us at Conway dwell, 
And two are gone to sea. 

“Two of us in the church-yard lie, 
My sister and my brother; 
And, in the church-yard cottage, I 
Dwell near them with my mother.” 

“You say that two at Conway dwell, 
And two are gone to sea, 
Yet ye are seven! I pray you tell, 
Sweet Maid, how this may be.” 

Then did the little Maid reply, 
“Seven boys and girls are we; 
Two of us in the church-yard lie, 
Beneath the church-yard tree.” 

“You run about, my little Maid, 
Your limbs they are alive; 
If two are in the church-yard laid, 
Then ye are only five.” 

“Their graves are green, they may be seen,” 
The little Maid replied, 
“Twelve steps or more from my mother’s door, 
And they are side by side. 

“My stockings there I often knit, 
My kerchief there I hem; 
And there upon the ground I sit, 
And sing a song to them. 

“And often after sun-set, Sir, 
When it is light and fair, 
I take my little porringer, 
And eat my supper there. 

“The first that died was sister Jane; 
In bed she moaning lay, 
Till God released her of her pain; 
And then she went away. 

“So in the church-yard she was laid; 
And, when the grass was dry, 
Together round her grave we played, 
My brother John and I. 

“And when the ground was white with snow, 
And I could run and slide, 
My brother John was forced to go, 
And he lies by her side.” 

“How many are you, then,” said I, 
“If they two are in heaven?” 
Quick was the little Maid’s reply, 
“O Master! we are seven.” 

“But they are dead; those two are dead! 
Their spirits are in heaven!” 
’Twas throwing words away; for still 
The little Maid would have her will, 
And said, “Nay, we are seven!”














Edgar-Allan-Poe-To-One-in-Paradise2

Edgar Allan Poe - To One in Paradise

Thou wast that all to me, love, 
For which my soul did pine— 
A green isle in the sea, love, 
A fountain and a shrine, 
All wreathed with fairy fruits and flowers, 
And all the flowers were mine. 

Ah, dream too bright to last! 
Ah, starry Hope! that didst arise 
But to be overcast! 
A voice from out the Future cries, 
“On! on!”—but o’er the Past 
(Dim gulf!) my spirit hovering lies 
Mute, motionless, aghast! 

For, alas! alas! with me 
The light of Life is o’er! 
No more—no more—no more— 
(Such language holds the solemn sea 
To the sands upon the shore) 
Shall bloom the thunder-blasted tree, 
Or the stricken eagle soar! 

And all my days are trances, 
And all my nightly dreams 
Are where thy grey eye glances, 
And where thy footstep gleams— 
In what ethereal dances, 
By what eternal streams. 

























Ella-Wheeler-Wilcox-Three-and-One

Ella Wheeler Wilcox - Three and One

Sometimes she seems so helpless and mild, 
So full of sweet unreason and so weak, 
So prone to some capricious whim or freak; 
Now gay, now tearful, and now anger-wild, 
By her strange moods of waywardness beguiled
And entertained, I stroke her pretty cheek, 
And soothing words of peace and comfort speak; 
And love her as a father loves a child.

Sometimes when I am troubled and sore pressed
On every side by fast advancing care, 
She rises up with such majestic air, 
I deem her some Olympian goddess-guest, 
Who brings my heart new courage, hope, and rest.
In her brave eyes dwells balm for my despair, 
And then I seem, while fondly gazing there, 
A loving child upon my mothers breast.

Again, when her warm veins are full of life, 
And youth’s volcanic tidal wave of fire
Sends the swift mercury of her pulses higher, 
Her beauty stirs my heart to maddening strife, 
And all the tiger in my blood is rife; 
I love her with a lover’s fierce desire, 
And find in her my dream, complete, entire, 
Child, Mother, Mistress – all in one word – Wife. 











Ella-Wheeler-Wilcox-Surrender

Ella Wheeler Wilcox - Surrender

Love, when we met, 'twas like two planets meeting. 
    Strange chaos followed; body, soul, and heart 
Seemed shaken, thrilled, and startled by that greeting, 
    Old ties, old dreams, old aims, all torn apart, 
And wrenched away, left nothing there the while 
But the great shining glory of your smile.

I knew no past; 'twas all a blurred, bleak waste; 
    I asked no future; 'twas a blinding glare. 
I only saw the present: as men taste 
    Some stimulating wine, and lose all care, 
I tasted Love's elixir, and I seemed 
Dwelling in some strange land, like one who dreamed.

It was a godlike separate existence; 
    Our world was set apart in some fair clime. 
I had no will, no purpose, no resistance; 
    I only knew I loved you for all time. 
The earth seemed something foreign and afar, 
And we two, sovereigns dwelling in a star!

It is so sad, so strange, I almost doubt 
    That all those years could be, before we met. 
Do you not wish that we could blot them out? 
    Obliterate them wholly, and forget 
That we had any part in life until 
We clasped each other with Love's rapture thrill?

My being trembled to its very centre 
    At that first kiss. Cold Reason stood aside 
With folded arms to let a grand Love enter 
    In my Soul's secret chamber to abide. 
Its great High Priest, my first Love and my last, 
There on its altar I consumed my past.

And all my life I lay upon its shrine 
    The best emotions of my heart and brain, 
Whatever gifts and graces may be mine; 
    No secret thought, no memory I retain, 
But give them all for dear Love's precious sake; 
Complete surrender of the whole I make.

















Sara-Teasdale-Stars

Sara Teasdale - Stars

Alone in the night 
On a dark hill 
With pines around me 
Spicy and still, 

And a heaven full of stars 
Over my head 
White and topaz 
And misty red; 

Myriads with beating 
Hearts of fire 
The aeons 
Cannot vex or tire; 

Up the dome of heaven 
Like a great hill 
I watch them marching 
Stately and still. 

And I know that I 
Am honored to be 
Witness 
Of so much majesty.











Henry-Lawson-Stand-By-The-Engines

Henry Lawson - Stand By The Engines

On the moonlighted decks there are children at play, 
While smoothly the steamer is holding her way; 
And the old folks are chatting on deck-seats and chairs, 
And the lads and the lassies go strolling in pairs. 

Some gaze half-entranced on the beautiful sea, 
And wonder perhaps if a vision it be: 
And surely their journeys no sorrow nor care, 
For wealth, love, and beauty are passengers there. 

But down underneath, ’mid the coal dust that smears 
The face and the hands, work the ship’s engineers. 
Whate’er be the duty of others, ’tis theirs 
To stand by their engines whatever occurs. 

The sailor may gaze on the sea and the sky; 
The sailor may tell when the danger is nigh; 
But when Death his black head o’er the waters uprears, 
Unseen he is met by the ship’s engineers. 

They are thrown from their feet by the force of a shock; 
They know that their vessel has struck on a rock. 
Now stand by your engines when danger appears, 
For all may depend on the ship’s engineers! 

No thought of their danger! No mad rush on deck! 
They stand at their posts in the hull of a wreck, 
Firm hands on the valves; and the white steam appears; 
And down with their ship go the brave engineers!












William-Morris-Springs-Bedfellow

William Morris - Spring's Bedfellow

Spring went about the woods to-day,
The soft-foot winter-thief,
And found where idle sorrow lay
’Twixt flower and faded leaf.
She looked on him, and found him fair
For all she had been told;
She knelt adown beside him there,
And sang of days of old.

His open eyes beheld her nought,
Yet ’gan his lips to move;
But life and deeds were in her thought,
And he would sing of love.

So sang they till their eyes did meet,
And faded fear and shame;
More bold he grew, and she more sweet,
Until they sang the same.

Until, say they who know the thing,
Their very lips did kiss,
And Sorrow laid abed with Spring
Begat an earthly bliss.











Francesco-Petrarca-Sonnet-IV

Francesco Petrarca - Sonnet IV











William-Shakespeare-Sonnet-73

William Shakespeare - Sonnet 73

That time of year thou may'st in me behold 
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, 
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. 
In me thou see'st the twilight of such day, 
As after sunset fadeth in the west, 
Which by-and-by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. 
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire 
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, 
As the death-bed whereon it must expire 
Consum'd with that which it was nourish'd by. 
   This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
   To love that well which thou must leave ere long.















William-Shakespeare-Sonnet-30

William Shakespeare - Sonnet 30

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past, 
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought, 
And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste:
Then can I drown an eye, unus'd to flow, 
For precious friends hid in death's dateless night,
And weep afresh love's long since cancell'd woe, 
And moan the expense of many a vanish'd sight: 
Then can I grieve at grievances foregone, 
And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er 
The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan, 
Which I new pay as if not paid before. 
But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
All losses are restor'd and sorrows end.















William-Shakespeare-Sonnet-116

William Shakespeare - Sonnet 116

Let me not to the marriage of true minds 
Admit impediments. Love is not love 
Which alters when it alteration finds, 
Or bends with the remover to remove. 
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark 
That looks on tempests and is never shaken; 
It is the star to every wand'ring bark, 
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken. 
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks 
Within his bending sickle's compass come; 
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, 
But bears it out even to the edge of doom. 
If this be error and upon me prov'd, 
I never writ, nor no man ever lov'd.












William-Cullen-Bryant-Song-of-Marions-Men

William Cullen Bryant - Song of Marion's Men

Our band is few, but true and tried, 
Our leader frank and bold; 
The British soldier trembles 
When Marion's name is told. 
Our fortress is the good greenwood, 
Our tent the cypress-tree; 
We know the forest round us, 
As seamen know the sea; 
We know its walks of thorny vines, 
Its glades of reedy grass, 
Its safe and silent islands 
Within the dark morass. 


Woe to the English soldiery 
That little dread us near! 
On them shall light at midnight 
A strange and sudden fear; 
When, waking to their tents on fire, 
They grasp their arms in vain, 
And they who stand to face us 
Are beat to earth again; 
And they who fly in terror deem 
A mighty host behind, 
And hear the tramp of thousands 
Upon the hollow wind. 


Then sweet the hour that brings release 
From danger and from toil; 
We talk the battle over, 
And share the battle's spoil. 
The woodland rings with laugh and shout, 
As if a hunt were up, 
And woodland flowers are gathered 
To crown the soldier's cup. 
With merry songs we mock the wind 
That in the pine-top grieves, 
And slumber long and sweetly 
On beds of oaken leaves. 


Well knows the fair and friendly moon 
The band that Marion leads- 
The glitter of their rifles, 
The scampering of their steeds. 
'Tis life to guide the fiery barb 
Across the moonlight plain; 
'Tis life to feel the night-wind 
That lifts his tossing mane. 
A moment in the British camp- 
A moment - and away, 
Back to the pathless forest, 
Before the peep of day. 


Grave men there are by broad Santee, 
Grave men with hoary hairs; 
Their hearts are all with Marion, 
For Marion are their prayers. 
And lovely ladies greet our band, 
With kindest welcoming, 
With smiles like those of summer, 
And tears like those of spring. 
For them we wear these trusty arms, 
And lay them down no more 
Till we have driven the Briton, 
Forever, from our shore. 


















Frederick-William-Faber-Socrates

Frederick William Faber - Socrates

"Of making many books there is no end; and much study is an affliction of the flesh."

Thou, mighty Heathen, wert not so bereft
Of heavenly helps to thy great-hearted deeds,
That thou shouldst dig for truths in broken creeds,
'Mid the loose sands of four old empires left.
Motions and shadows dimly glowing fell
On thy broad soul from forms invisible.
With its plain grandeur, simple, calm, and free,
What wonder was it that thy life should merit
Sparkles of grace, and angel ministry,
With jealous glimpses of the world of spirit?
Greatest and best in this--that thy pure mind,
Upon its saving mission all intent,
Scorned the untruth of leaving books behind,
To claim for thine what through thy lips was sent.











Philip-Freneau-The-Power-of-Fancy

Philip Freneau - The Power of Fancy

Wakeful, vagrant, restless thing, 
Ever wandering on the wing, 
Who thy wondrous source can find, 
Fancy, regent of the mind; 
A spark from Jove's resplendent throne, 
But thy nature all unknown. 
This spark of bright, celestial flame, 
From Jove's seraphic altar came, 
And hence alone in man we trace, 
Resemblance to the immortal race. 
Ah! what is all this mighty whole, 
These suns and stars that round us roll! 
What are they all, where'er they shine, 
But Fancies of the Power Divine! 
What is this globe, these lands, and seas, 
And heat, and cold, and flowers, and trees, 
And life, and death, and beast, and man, 
And time — that with the sun began — 
But thoughts on reason's scale combin'd, 
Ideas of the Almighty mind! 
On the surface of the brain 
Night after night she walks unseen, 
Noble fabrics doth she raise 
In the woods or on the seas, 
On some high, steep, pointed rock, 
Where the billows loudly knock 
And the dreary tempests sweep 
Clouds along the uncivil deep. 
Lo! she walks upon the moon, 
Listens to the chimy tune 
Of the bright, harmonious spheres, 
And the song of angels hears; 
Sees this earth a distant star, 
Pendant, floating in the air; 
Leads me to some lonely dome, 
Where Religion loves to come, 
Where the bride of Jesus dwells, 
And the deep ton'd organ swells 
In notes with lofty anthems join'd, 
Notes that half distract the mind. 
Now like lightning she descends 
To the prison of the fiends, 
Hears the rattling of their chains, 
Feels their never ceasing pains — 
But, O never may she tell 
Half the frightfulness of hell. 
Now she views Arcadian rocks, 
Where the shepherds guard their flocks, 
And, while yet her wings she spreads, 
Sees chrystal streams and coral beds, 
Wanders to some desert deep, 
Or some dark, enchanted steep, 
By the full moonlight doth shew 
Forests of a dusky blue, 
Where, upon some mossy bed, 
Innocence reclines her head. 
Swift, she stretches o'er the seas 
To the far off Hebrides, 
Canvas on the lofty mast 
Could not travel half so fast — 
Swifter than the eagle's flight 
Or instantaneous rays of light! 
Lo! contemplative she stands 
On Norwegia's rocky lands — 
Fickle Goddess, set me down 
Where the rugged winters frown 
Upon Orca's howling steep, 
Nodding o'er the northern deep, 
Where the winds tumultuous roar, 
Vext that Ossian sings no more. 
Fancy, to that land repair, 
Sweetest Ossian slumbers there; 
Waft me far to southern isles 
Where the soften'd winter smiles, 
To Bermuda's orange shades, 
Or Demarara's lovely glades; 
Bear me o'er the sounding cape, 
Painting death in every shape, 
Where daring Anson spread the sail 
Shatter'd by the stormy gale — 
Lo! she leads me wide and far, 
Sense can never follow her — 
Shape thy course o'er land and sea, 
Help me to keep pace with thee, 
Lead me to yon' chalky cliff, 
Over rock and over reef, 
Into Britain's fertile land, 
Stretching far her proud command. 
Look back and view, thro' many a year, 
Caesar, Julius Caesar, there. 
Now to Tempe's verdant wood, 
Over the mid-ocean flood 
Lo! the islands of the sea — 
Sappho, Lesbos mourns for thee: 
Greece, arouse thy humbled head, 
Where are all thy mighty dead, 
Who states to endless ruin hurl'd 
And carried vengeance through the world? — 
Troy, thy vanish'd pomp resume, 
Or, weeping at thy Hector's tomb, 
Yet those faded scenes renew, 
Whose memory is to Homer due. 
Fancy, lead me wandering still 
Up to Ida's cloud-topt hill; 
Not a laurel there doth grow 
But in vision thou shalt show, — 
Every sprig on Virgil's tomb 
Shall in livelier colours bloom, 
And every triumph Rome has seen 
Flourish on the years between. 
Now she bears me far away 
In the east to meet the day, 
Leads me over Ganges' streams, 
Mother of the morning beams — 
O'er the ocean hath she ran, 
Places me on Tinian; 
Farther, farther in the east, 
Till it almost meets the west, 
Let us wandering both be lost 
On Taitis sea-beat coast, 
Bear me from that distant strand, 
Over ocean, over land, 
To California's golden shore — 
Fancy, stop, and rove no more. 
Now, tho' late, returning home, 
Lead me to Belinda's tomb; 
Let me glide as well as you 
Through the shroud and coffin too, 
And behold, a moment, there, 
All that once was good and fair — 
Who doth here so soundly sleep? 
Shall we break this prison deep? — 
Thunders cannot wake the maid, 
Lightnings cannot pierce the shade, 
And tho' wintry tempests roar, 
Tempests shall disturb no more. 
Yet must those eyes in darkness stay, 
That once were rivals to the day? — 
Like heaven's bright lamp beneath the main 
They are but set to rise again. 
Fancy, thou the muses' pride, 
In thy painted realms reside 
Endless images of things, 
Fluttering each on golden wings, 
Ideal objects, such a store, 
The universe could hold no more: 
Fancy, to thy power I owe 
Half my happiness below; 
By thee Elysian groves were made, 
Thine were the notes that Orpheus play'd; 
By thee was Pluto charm'd so well 
While rapture seiz'd the sons of hell — 
Come, O come — perceiv'd by none, 
You and I will walk alone.













Arthur-Adams-The-Pleiades

Arthur Adams - The Pleiades

LAST night I saw the Pleiades again,   
 Faint as a drift of steam   
   From some tall chimney-stack;   
And I remembered you as you were then:   
 Awoke dead worlds of dream,           
   And Time turned slowly back.   
  
I saw the Pleiades through branches bare,   
 And close to mine your face   
   Soft glowing in the dark;   
For Youth and Hope and Love and You were there           
 At our dear trysting-place   
   In that bleak London park.   
  
And as we kissed the Pleiades looked down   
 From their immeasurable   
   Aloofness in cold Space.           
Do you remember how a last leaf brown   
 Between us flickering fell   
   Soft on your upturned face?   
  
Last night I saw the Pleiades again,   
 Here in the alien South,           
   Where no leaves fade at all;   
And I remembered you as you were then,   
 And felt upon my mouth   
   Your leaf-light kisses fall!   
  
The Pleiades remember and look down           
 On me made old with grief,   
   Who then a young god stood,   
When you—now lost and trampled by the Town,   
 A lone wind-driven leaf,—   
   Were young and sweet and good!
















William-Blake-Night

William Blake - Night

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine;
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.
The moon, like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

Farewell, green fields and happy groves,
Where flocks have took delight.
Where lambs have nibbled, silent moves
The feet of angels bright;
Unseen they pour blessing,
And joy without ceasing,
On each bud and blossom,
And each sleeping bosom.

They look in every thoughtless nest,
Where birds are covered warm;
They visit caves of every beast,
To keep them all from harm.
If they see any weeping
That should have been sleeping,
They pour sleep on their head,
And sit down by their bed.

When wolves and tigers howl for prey,
They pitying stand and weep;
Seeking to drive their thirst away,
And keep them from the sheep.
But if they rush dreadful,
The angels, most heedful,
Receive each mild spirit,
New worlds to inherit.

And there the lion's ruddy eyes
Shall flow with tears of gold,
And pitying the tender cries,
And walking round the fold,
Saying, 'Wrath, by His meekness,
And, by His health, sickness
Is driven away
From our immortal day.

'And now beside thee, bleating lamb,
I can lie down and sleep;
Or think on Him who bore thy name,
Graze after thee and weep.
For, washed in life's river,
My bright mane for ever
Shall shine like the gold
As I guard o'er the fold.' 
















Mathilde-Blind-The-Music-Lesson

Mathilde Blind - The Music Lesson

A thrush alit on a young-leaved spray, 
And, lightly clinging, 
It rocked in its singing 
As the rapturous notes rose loud and gay; 
And with liquid shakes, 
And trills and breaks, 
Rippled though blossoming bough of May. 

Like a ball of fluff, with a warm brown throat 
And throbbing bosom, 
'Mid the apple-blossom, 
The new-fledged nestling sat learning by rote 
To echo the song 
So tender and strong, 
As it feebly put in its frail little note. 

O blissfullest lesson amid the green grove! 
The low wind crispeth 
The leaves, where lispeth 
The shy little bird with its parent above; 
Two voices that mingle 
And make but a single 
Hymn of rejoicing in praise of their love.














Joyce-Kilmer-Memorial-Day

Joyce Kilmer - Memorial Day

"Dulce et decorum est" 

The bugle echoes shrill and sweet,
But not of war it sings to-day.
The road is rhythmic with the feet
Of men-at-arms who come to pray. 

The roses blossom white and red
On tombs where weary soldiers lie;
Flags wave above the honored dead
And martial music cleaves the sky. 

Above their wreath-strewn graves we kneel,
They kept the faith and fought the fight.
Through flying lead and crimson steel
They plunged for Freedom and the Right. 

May we, their grateful children, learn
Their strength, who lie beneath this sod,
Who went through fire and death to earn
At last the accolade of God. 

In shining rank on rank arrayed
They march, the legions of the Lord;
He is their Captain unafraid,
The Prince of Peace . . . Who brought a sword. 













Herman-Melville-The-Maldive-Shark

Herman Melville - The Maldive Shark

About the Shark, phlegmatical one, 
Pale sot of the Maldive sea, 
The sleek little pilot-fish, azure and slim, 
How alert in attendance be. 
From his saw-pit of mouth, from his charnel of maw 
They have nothing of harm to dread, 
But liquidly glide on his ghastly flank 
Or before his Gorgonian head; 
Or lurk in the port of serrated teeth 
In white triple tiers of glittering gates, 
And there find a haven when peril’s abroad, 
An asylum in jaws of the Fates! 
They are friends; and friendly they guide him to prey, 
Yet never partake of the treat— 
Eyes and brains to the dotard lethargic and dull, 
Pale ravener of horrible meat.














Joyce-Kilmer-Main-Street

Joyce Kilmer - Main Street

I like to look at the blossomy track of the moon upon the sea,
But it isn't half so fine a sight as Main Street used to be
When it all was covered over with a couple of feet of snow,
And over the crisp and radiant road the ringing sleighs would go. 

Now, Main Street bordered with autumn leaves, it was a pleasant thing,
And its gutters were gay with dandelions early in the Spring;
I like to think of it white with frost or dusty in the heat,
Because I think it is humaner than any other street. 

A city street that is busy and wide is ground by a thousand wheels,
And a burden of traffic on its breast is all it ever feels:
It is dully conscious of weight and speed and of work that never ends,
But it cannot be human like Main Street, and recognise its friends. 

There were only about a hundred teams on Main Street in a day,
And twenty or thirty people, I guess, and some children out to play.
And there wasn't a wagon or buggy, or a man or a girl or a boy
That Main Street didn't remember, and somehow seem to enjoy. 

The truck and the motor and trolley car and the elevated train
They make the weary city street reverberate with pain:
But there is yet an echo left deep down within my heart
Of the music the Main Street cobblestones made beneath a butcher's cart. 

God be thanked for the Milky Way that runs across the sky,
That's the path that my feet would tread whenever I have to die.
Some folks call it a Silver Sword, and some a Pearly Crown,
But the only thing I think it is, is Main Street, Heaventown.












Sir-John-Carr-Lines-on-a-Little-Bird

Sir John Carr - Lines on a Little Bird

Go, little flutt'rer! seek thy feather'd loves,
And leave a wretched mourner to his woe;
Seek out the bow'rs of bliss, seek happier groves,
Nor here unheeded let thy music flow.

Yet think me not ungrateful for thy song,
If meant to cheer me in my lone retreat;
Ah! not to thee, my little friend! belong
The pow'rs to soothe the pangs of adverse fate.

Fly, then! the window of the wretched, fly!
And be thy harmless life for ever blest;
I only can reward thee with a sigh,
And wish that joys may crown thy peaceful nest. 








Alfred-Lord-Tennyson-The-Lady-of-Shalott

Alfred, Lord Tennyson - The Lady of Shalott

Part I
On either side the river lie 
Long fields of barley and of rye, 
That clothe the wold and meet the sky; 
And thro' the field the road runs by 
       To many-tower'd Camelot; 
And up and down the people go, 
Gazing where the lilies blow 
Round an island there below, 
       The island of Shalott. 

Willows whiten, aspens quiver, 
Little breezes dusk and shiver 
Thro' the wave that runs for ever 
By the island in the river 
       Flowing down to Camelot. 
Four gray walls, and four gray towers, 
Overlook a space of flowers, 
And the silent isle imbowers 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

By the margin, willow veil'd, 
Slide the heavy barges trail'd 
By slow horses; and unhail'd 
The shallop flitteth silken-sail'd 
       Skimming down to Camelot: 
But who hath seen her wave her hand? 
Or at the casement seen her stand? 
Or is she known in all the land, 
       The Lady of Shalott? 

Only reapers, reaping early 
In among the bearded barley, 
Hear a song that echoes cheerly 
From the river winding clearly, 
       Down to tower'd Camelot: 
And by the moon the reaper weary, 
Piling sheaves in uplands airy, 
Listening, whispers " 'Tis the fairy 
       Lady of Shalott." 

Part II
There she weaves by night and day 
A magic web with colours gay. 
She has heard a whisper say, 
A curse is on her if she stay 
       To look down to Camelot. 
She knows not what the curse may be, 
And so she weaveth steadily, 
And little other care hath she, 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

And moving thro' a mirror clear 
That hangs before her all the year, 
Shadows of the world appear. 
There she sees the highway near 
       Winding down to Camelot: 
There the river eddy whirls, 
And there the surly village-churls, 
And the red cloaks of market girls, 
       Pass onward from Shalott. 

Sometimes a troop of damsels glad, 
An abbot on an ambling pad, 
Sometimes a curly shepherd-lad, 
Or long-hair'd page in crimson clad, 
       Goes by to tower'd Camelot; 
And sometimes thro' the mirror blue 
The knights come riding two and two: 
She hath no loyal knight and true, 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

But in her web she still delights 
To weave the mirror's magic sights, 
For often thro' the silent nights 
A funeral, with plumes and lights 
       And music, went to Camelot: 
Or when the moon was overhead, 
Came two young lovers lately wed: 
"I am half sick of shadows," said 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

Part III
A bow-shot from her bower-eaves, 
He rode between the barley-sheaves, 
The sun came dazzling thro' the leaves, 
And flamed upon the brazen greaves 
       Of bold Sir Lancelot. 
A red-cross knight for ever kneel'd 
To a lady in his shield, 
That sparkled on the yellow field, 
       Beside remote Shalott. 

The gemmy bridle glitter'd free, 
Like to some branch of stars we see 
Hung in the golden Galaxy. 
The bridle bells rang merrily 
       As he rode down to Camelot: 
And from his blazon'd baldric slung 
A mighty silver bugle hung, 
And as he rode his armour rung, 
       Beside remote Shalott. 

All in the blue unclouded weather 
Thick-jewell'd shone the saddle-leather, 
The helmet and the helmet-feather 
Burn'd like one burning flame together, 
       As he rode down to Camelot. 
As often thro' the purple night, 
Below the starry clusters bright, 
Some bearded meteor, trailing light, 
       Moves over still Shalott. 

His broad clear brow in sunlight glow'd; 
On burnish'd hooves his war-horse trode; 
From underneath his helmet flow'd 
His coal-black curls as on he rode, 
       As he rode down to Camelot. 
From the bank and from the river 
He flash'd into the crystal mirror, 
"Tirra lirra," by the river 
       Sang Sir Lancelot. 

She left the web, she left the loom, 
She made three paces thro' the room, 
She saw the water-lily bloom, 
She saw the helmet and the plume, 
       She look'd down to Camelot. 
Out flew the web and floated wide; 
The mirror crack'd from side to side; 
"The curse is come upon me," cried 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

Part IV
In the stormy east-wind straining, 
The pale yellow woods were waning, 
The broad stream in his banks complaining, 
Heavily the low sky raining 
       Over tower'd Camelot; 
Down she came and found a boat 
Beneath a willow left afloat, 
And round about the prow she wrote 
       The Lady of Shalott.

And down the river's dim expanse 
Like some bold seër in a trance, 
Seeing all his own mischance— 
With a glassy countenance 
       Did she look to Camelot. 
And at the closing of the day 
She loosed the chain, and down she lay; 
The broad stream bore her far away, 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

Lying, robed in snowy white 
That loosely flew to left and right— 
The leaves upon her falling light— 
Thro' the noises of the night 
       She floated down to Camelot: 
And as the boat-head wound along 
The willowy hills and fields among, 
They heard her singing her last song, 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

Heard a carol, mournful, holy, 
Chanted loudly, chanted lowly, 
Till her blood was frozen slowly, 
And her eyes were darken'd wholly, 
       Turn'd to tower'd Camelot. 
For ere she reach'd upon the tide 
The first house by the water-side, 
Singing in her song she died, 
       The Lady of Shalott. 

Under tower and balcony, 
By garden-wall and gallery, 
A gleaming shape she floated by, 
Dead-pale between the houses high, 
       Silent into Camelot. 
Out upon the wharfs they came, 
Knight and burgher, lord and dame, 
And round the prow they read her name, 
       The Lady of Shalott.

Who is this? and what is here? 
And in the lighted palace near 
Died the sound of royal cheer; 
And they cross'd themselves for fear, 
       All the knights at Camelot: 
But Lancelot mused a little space; 
He said, "She has a lovely face; 
God in his mercy lend her grace, 
       The Lady of Shalott." 














Sara-Teasdale-I-Love-You

Sara Teasdale - I Love You

When April bends above me 
And finds me fast asleep 
Dust need not keep the secret 
A live heart died to keep.

When April tells the thrushes, 
The meadow-larks will know, 
And pipe the three words lightly 
To all the winds that blow.

Above his roof the swallows, 
In notes like far-blown rain, 
Will tell the little sparrow 
Beside his window-pane.

O sparrow, little sparrow, 
When I am fast asleep, 
Then tell my love the secret 
That I have died to keep. 









Joyce-Kilmer-The-House-with-Nobody-in-It

Joyce Kilmer - The House with Nobody in It

Whenever I walk to Suffern along the Erie track
I go by a poor old farmhouse with its shingles broken and black.
I suppose I've passed it a hundred times, but I always stop for a minute
And look at the house, the tragic house, the house with nobody in it. 

I never have seen a haunted house, but I hear there are such things;
That they hold the talk of spirits, their mirth and sorrowings.
I know this house isn't haunted, and I wish it were, I do;
For it wouldn't be so lonely if it had a ghost or two. 

This house on the road to Suffern needs a dozen panes of glass,
And somebody ought to weed the walk and take a scythe to the grass.
It needs new paint and shingles, and the vines should be trimmed and tied;
But what it needs the most of all is some people living inside. 

If I had a lot of money and all my debts were paid
I'd put a gang of men to work with brush and saw and spade.
I'd buy that place and fix it up the way it used to be
And I'd find some people who wanted a home and give it to them free. 

Now, a new house standing empty, with staring window and door,
Looks idle, perhaps, and foolish, like a hat on its block in the store.
But there's nothing mournful about it; it cannot be sad and lone
For the lack of something within it that it has never known. 

But a house that has done what a house should do,
a house that has sheltered life,
That has put its loving wooden arms around a man and his wife,
A house that has echoed a baby's laugh and held up his stumbling feet,
Is the saddest sight, when it's left alone, that ever your eyes could meet. 

So whenever I go to Suffern along the Erie track
I never go by the empty house without stopping and looking back,
Yet it hurts me to look at the crumbling roof and the shutters fallen apart,
For I can't help thinking the poor old house is a house with a broken heart. 












Sara-Teasdale-But-Not-to-Me

Sara Teasdale - But Not to Me

The April night is still and sweet 
With flowers on every tree; 
Peace comes to them on quiet feet, 
But not to me.

My peace is hidden in his breast 
Where I shall never be, 
Love comes to-night to all the rest, 
But not to me. 









Amy-Lowell-Azure-and-Gold

Amy Lowell - Azure and Gold

April had covered the hills 
With flickering yellows and reds, 
The sparkle and coolness of snow 
Was blown from the mountain beds. 

Across a deep-sunken stream 
The pink of blossoming trees, 
And from windless appleblooms 
The humming of many bees. 

The air was of rose and gold 
Arabesqued with the song of birds 
Who, swinging unseen under leaves, 
Made music more eager than words. 

Of a sudden, aslant the road, 
A brightness to dazzle and stun, 
A glint of the bluest blue, 
A flash from a sapphire sun. 

Blue-birds so blue, 'twas a dream, 
An impossible, unconceived hue, 
The high sky of summer dropped down 
Some rapturous ocean to woo. 

Such a colour, such infinite light! 
The heart of a fabulous gem, 
Many-faceted, brilliant and rare. 
Centre Stone of the earth's diadem! 

Centre Stone of the Crown of the World, 
"Sincerity" graved on your youth! 
And your eyes hold the blue-bird flash, 
The sapphire shaft, which is truth. 



















Arthur-Symons-April-Midnight

Arthur Symons - April Midnight

Side by side through the streets at midnight,
Roaming together,
Through the tumultuous night of London,
In the miraculous April weather.

Roaming together under the gaslight,
Day’s work over,
How the Spring calls to us, here in the city,
Calls to the heart from the heart of a lover!

Cool to the wind blows, fresh in our faces,
Cleansing, entrancing,
After the heat and the fumes and the footlights,
Where you dance and I watch your dancing.

Good it is to be here together,
Good to be roaming,
Even in London, even at midnight,
Lover-like in a lover’s gloaming.

You the dancer and I the dreamer,
Children together,
Wandering lost in the night of London,
In the miraculous April weather.









Ernest-Dowson-April-Love

Ernest Dowson - April Love

We have walked in Love's land a little way,
We have learnt his lesson a little while,
And shall we not part at the end of day,
With a sigh, a smile?
A little while in the shine of the sun,
We were twined together, joined lips, forgot
How the shadows fall when the day is done,
And when Love is not.
We have made no vows--there will none be broke,
Our love was free as the wind on the hill,
There was no word said we need wish unspoke,
We have wrought no ill.
So shall we not part at the end of day,
Who have loved and lingered a little while,
Join lips for the last time, go our way,
With a sigh, a smile?










Mary-Jones-After-the-Small-Pox

Mary Jones - After the Small Pox

When skilful traders first set up,
To draw the people to their shop,
They straight hang out some gaudy sign,
Expressive of the goods within.
The Vintner has his boy and grapes,
The Haberdasher thread and tapes,
The Shoemaker exposes boots,
And Monmouth Street old tatter'd suits.

So fares it with the nymph divine;
For what is beauty but a sign?
A face hung out, through which is seen
The nature of the goods within.
Thus the coquette her beau ensnares
With studied smile and forward airs;
The graver prude hangs out a frown
To strike the audacious gazer down;
But she alone whose temperate wit
Each nicer medium can hit,
Is still adorn'd with every grace,
And wears a sample in her face.

What though some envious folks have said
That Stella now must hide her head,
That all her stock of beauty's gone,
And e'en the very sign took down;
Yet grieve not at the fatal blow,
For if you break awhile, we know
'T is bankrupt like, more rich to grow.
A fairer sign you'll soon hang up,
And with fresh credit open shop;
For nature's pencil soon shall trace,
And once more finish off your face:
Which all your neighbours shall outshine,
And of your Mind remain the sign!













Short-Poetry-Collection-155

Short Poetry Collection 155


Links:


Billboard Hot 100 - Letras de Músicas | Song Lyrics - Songtext - Testo Canzone - Paroles Musique - 歌曲歌词 - 歌詞 - كلمات الاغنية - песни Текст

Educação Infantil - Vídeos, Jogos e Atividades Educativas para crianças de 4 à 11 anos

Língua Portuguesa e Atualidades

Arte e Estética

Santa Catarina - Conheça seu Estado

São Paulo - Conheça seu Estado

Paraná - Conheça seu Estado

Mato Grosso do Sul - Conheça seu Estado

Salmos - Capítulo 23 - Bíblia Online

O Diário de Anne Frank

Capítulo 2 - Macunaíma - Mário de Andrade

Dom Casmurro - Machado de Assis

Quincas Borba - Machado de Assis

Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas - Machado de Assis

O Triste Fim de Policarpo Quaresma - Lima Barreto

Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler

Cinco Minutos - José de Alencar

02. Cronologia da Terra - História em 1 Minuto

TOP 10: Poesia - Poemas em Português, Espanhol, francês e inglês


Esta Velha - Álvaro de Campos (Heterónimo de Fernando Pessoa)

Espasmo - Mario de Andrade

Exaltação da Paz - Mario de Andrade

Uma lembrança - Emília Freitas

Contemplações - Cordélia Sylvia

Morte de Raquel - Madalena da Glória

Canção do exílio - Gonçalves Dias

Sóror Maria do Céu - Sobre as palavras do padre Vieira

Prece - Natalina Cordeiro

A Raposa e as Uvas - Manuel Maria Barbosa du Bocage

Luís Vaz de Camões - Apolo e as Nove Musas Descantando

Se tu viesses ver-me - Florbela Espanca

Que falta nesta cidade - Gregório de Matos

Flor da Mocidade - Machado de Assis

Velhas Árvores - Olavo Bilac

Ismalia - Alphonsus de Guimaraens

A Esperança - Augusto dos Anjos

Song of myself - Walt Whitman

Bonsoir - Amado Nervo

La Géante - Charles Baudelaire

Languidez - Florbela Espanca

O Fogo que na Branda Cera Ardia - Soneto 07 - Luís Vaz de Camões

Lésbia- Broquéis - João da Cruz e Sousa

A criança - Os Escravos - Castro Alves

O morcego- Augusto dos Anjos - Eu e Outras Poesia

TOP 30: PDF para Download - Domínio Público


Livros em PDF para Download

O Diário de Anne Frank - Edição Definitiva - Anne Frank

Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler - Download PDF Livro Online

345 - Artur Azevedo - PDF

Eterna Mágoa - Augusto dos Anjos - Download

A Brasileira de Prazins - Camilo Castelo Branco - Download

A boa vista - Castro Alves - PDF

Charles Baudelaire

Paraísos artificiais - Charles Baudelaire - PDF

A Poesia Interminável - Cruz e Sousa - Livro Online

A Divina Comédia - Dante Alighieri - Livro Online

A capital - Eça de Queiros - PDF

À Margem Da História - Euclides da Cunha - PDF

A Hora do Diabo e outros contos - Fernando Pessoa - Livros em PDF para Download

Fiódor Mikhailovitch Dostoiévsk - Fedor Dostoievski - Livros em PDF para Download

Uma Criatura Dócil - Fiódor Mikhailovitch Dostoiévsk - Fedor Dostoievski

Franz Kafka - PDF

A Metamorfose - Franz Kafka - PDF

Gustave Flaubert em português - Livros em PDF para Download

Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert - PDF

Ilíada - Homero - Download

Dublinenses - James Joyce - Download

A Abadia De Northanger - Jane Austen - Download PDF Livro Online

A Alma do Lázaro - José de Alencar

A Morte de Ivan Ilitch - Leon Tolstói - Download

Machado de Assis

O Alienista

Esaú e Jacó

Dom Casmurro

Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas

Quincas Borba

A Carteira - Machado de Assis - PDF Download Livro Online

Michel de Montaigne - PDF Download Livro Online

Os Ensaios - Michel de Montaigne - PDF

A escrava que não é Isaura - Mário de Andrade - PDF Download Livro Online

Marcel Proust - Download PDF Livro Online

No Caminho de Swann – Em Busca do Tempo Perdido – Vol.1 - Marcel Proust

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra - Download PDF Livro Online

Don Quixote. Vol. 1 - Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

A Defesa Nacional - Olavo Bilac - PDF Download Livro Online

14 de Julho na roça - Raul Pompeia - PDF Download Livro Online

Cartas Chilenas - Tomás Antônio Gonzaga - PDF Download Livro Online

Victor Hugo - Victor Hugo - PDF Download Livro Online

Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf - PDF

William Shakespeare

A Comédia dos Erros - William-Shakespeare - Livros em PDF para Download

Bíblia Sagrada - João Ferreira de Almeida - Bíblia

Bíblia Sagrada - Católica

Bucólicas - Virgilio

TOP 30: Billboard - Letras de Músicas - Song Lyrics - Songtext


Today - Brad Paisley

Kids - OneRepublic

Ain't My Fault - Zara Larsson

Million Reasons - Lady Gaga

PPAP (Pen-Pineapple-Apple-Pen) - Piko-Taro

All Time Low - Jon Bellion

Don't Wanna Know - Maroon 5 Featuring Kendrick Lamar

Love Me Now - John Legend

24K Magic - Bruno Mars

GooFresh Eyes - Andy Grammer - Song Lyrics

Wanna Be That Song - Brett Eldredge - Song Lyrics

Song For Another Time - Old Dominion - Song Lyrics

Goosebumps - Travis Scott - Song Lyrics

LIFTED - CL - Song Lyrics

Capsize - Frenship & Emily Warren - Song Lyrics

Don't Touch My Hair - Solange Featuring Sampha - Song Lyrics

Mercy - Shawn Mendes - Letras de Música

Juju On That Beat (TZ Anthem) - Zay Hilfigerrr & Zayion McCall - Letras de Música

Hold Up - Beyonce - Letras de Música

HandClap - Fitz And The Tantrums - Songtext

Key To The Streets - YFN Lucci feat Migos & Trouble - Letras de Música

Wishing - DJ Drama feat Chris Brown, Skeme & Lyquin - Letras de Música

Too Much Sauce - DJ ESCO feat Future & Lil Uzi Vert - Letras de Música

All We Know - The Chainsmokers feat Phoebe Ryan - Letras de Música

Sleep Without You - Brett Young - Letras de Música

A Little More Summertime - Jason Aldean - Letras de Música

I Know Somebody - LoCash - Letras de Música

False Alarm - The Weeknd - Letras de Música

Rock On - Tucker Beathard - Letras de Música

Say It - Flume feat Tove Lo - Letras de Música

This Town - Niall Horan - Letras de Música

Scars To Your Beautiful - Alessia Cara - Song Lyrics

I Met A Girl - William Michael Morgan - Song Lyrics

Perfect Illusion - Lady Gaga - Song Lyrics

Pick Up The Phone - Young Thug And Travis Scott Featuring Quavo - Song Lyrics

Forever Country - Artists Of Then, Now & Forever - Song Lyrics

In The Name Of Love - Martin Garrix & Bebe Rexha - Song Lyrics

OOOUUU - Young M.A - Song Lyrics

Black Beatles - Rae Sremmurd feat Gucci Mane - Letras de Música

Starboy - The Weeknd feat Daft Punk - Song Lyrics

Side To Side - Ariana Grande feat Nicki Minaj - Song Lyrics

My Way - Calvin Harris - Song Lyrics

The Greatest - Sia feat Kendrick Lamar - Song Lyrics

Don't Mind - Kent Jones - Song Lyrics

Can't Stop The Feeling! - Justin Timberlake - Song Lyrics

This Is What You Came - Calvin Harris Ft. Rihanna - Song Lyrics

Cranes In The Sky - Solange - Song Lyrics

Sit Still, Look Pretty - Daya - Song Lyrics

May We All - Florida Georgia Line feat Tim McGraw

X - 21 Savage & Metro Boomin feat Future - Song Lyrics

Caroline - Amine - Song Lyrics

Blue Ain't Your Color - Keith Urban - Song Lyrics

Fade - Kanye West - Song Lyrics

TOP 60: Conheça seu Estado - História e Geografia


Mesorregião Serrana (SC)

Sul Catarinense (Mesorregião)

Vale do Itajaí (Mesorregião)

A história dos povos indígenas (UP)

Rio de Janeiro - Representação e Localização

O município e sua administração (RJ)

O clima no estado de São Paulo

Áreas de preservação no estado de São Paulo

A vegetação atual do estado de São Paulo

Formações florestais do estado de São Paulo

Vegetação nativa do estado de São Paulo entre 1500 a 2015

A história dos povos indígenas (PR)

Vegetação nativa do estado do Paraná

Formações florestais do estado do Paraná

A vegetação atual no estado do Paraná

Áreas de preservação do estado do Paraná

Biomas brasileiros

Natureza e condições ambientais do Mato Grosso do Sul

O crescimento populacional no estado de Mato Grosso do Sul

A população atual do estado de Mato Grosso do Sul

Os ciclos da economia do Mato Grosso do Sul

O Memorial de Iwo Jima

Não se renega o berço

Serra Pelada

Cortadores de cana

Uma morada para cada tempo e lugar

Pincel e tinta também imortalizam o espaço urbano

Espaço interno e design

A arte como registro histórico

A arte na Mídia

Rompendo com os padrões preestabelecidos

Apelido - Jogos para Crianças - Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental

Família - Jogos para Crianças - Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental

Frutas - Jogos para Crianças - Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental

Atividades Educativas Ensino Fundamental - Aprendendo sobre o Dinheiro

Curso de Inglês em 2 Horas - Aula 02 / 20 (Nível Básico)

Curso de Espanhol em 2 Horas - Aula 02 / 20 (Nível Básico)

Revisão de Inglês em 2 Horas - Aula 02 / 20 (Básico e Intermediário)

Progress 4GL - 0102 - Progress DCA - Parte 01

02-38 - SAP Business All-In-One Values and Benefits

Lima Barreto - Quase ela deu o sim, mas...

Esaú e Jacó - Machado de Assis

Diva - José de Alencar

A Dívida - Artur de Azevedo

Luís Soares - Contos Fluminenses e Histórias da Meia-Noite - 01 - Machado de Assis

Singularidades de uma rapariga loura, parte 2 - Contos de Eça de Queirós

Um Club da Má Língua - Fiódor Dostoiévski

Casa Velha - Machado de Assis

Amor de Perdição - Camilo Castelo Branco

À Margem da História - Euclides da Cunha

A Tempestade; Morte de Iracema; O Pampa - Eugênio Werneck - Antologia Brasileira

Euclides da Cunha - Os Sertões - 02 / 49

Machado de Assis - O Alienista - 02 / 09

Lima Barreto - O Triste Fim de Policarpo Quaresma - 02 / 15

Machado de Assis - A Mão e a Luva - 02 / 19

Raul Pompeia - O Ateneu - 02 / 12

Olavo Bilac - Contos para Velhos - 02 / 16

José de Alencar - Cinco Minutos - 02 / 10

Demóstenes - Oração da Coroa - Parte 2

Lima Barreto - Contos - 02 / 20

Gênesis - Bíblia - 02 / 10

William Shakespeare - Hamlet - 02 / 05

Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice - 02 / 61

William Shakespeare - Romeo and Juliet - 01 / 05

TOP 50: BLOG by Sanderlei Silveira


Biomas brasileiros - Santa Catarina - Conheça seu Estado (História e Geografia)

Idade das Religiões - História em 1 Minuto

As festas populares no estado de São Paulo - SP

O tropeirismo no estado do Paraná - PR

Pantanal – Patrimônio Natural da Humanidade - MS

Prédios mais altos do Mundo e do Brasil (Atualizado até 10/2016)

Os símbolos do estado do Rio de Janeiro - RJ

Poesia - Sanderlei Silveira

Canção do exílio - Gonçalves Dias

How Do I Love Thee? - Sonnet 43 - Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Road Not Taken - Robert Frost - Poetry in English

24K Magic - Bruno Mars - Letra Música

POVO E RAÇA - Mein Kampf (Minha luta) - Adolf Hitler

Macunaíma - Mário de Andrade

Tendências de mercado - Economia em 1 Minuto

O navio negreiro - Os Escravos - Castro Alves

Antífona - Broquéis - João da Cruz e Sousa

Euclides da Cunha - Os Sertões (Áudio Livro)

A aia - Contos de Eça de Queirós

Diva - José de Alencar - Audiobook

Amor é fogo que arde sem se ver - Sonetos - Poemas de Amor - Luís Vaz de Camões

Versos íntimos - Augusto dos Anjos - Eu e Outras Poesias

Curso de Espanhol Online - Grátis e Completo

Curso de Inglês Online - Grátis e Completo

O Diário de Anne Frank

Casa Velha – Machado de Assis - Livros em PDF para Download (Domínio Público)

Introduction to Design Thinking with SAP - SAP - Course Free Online

Totvs - Datasul - Treinamento Online (Gratuito)

Mitología Griega - Historia en 1 Minuto

Religion - Ancient History - History in 1 Minute

Salmos 22 - Bíblia Online

Olavo Bilac - Contos para Velhos - Áudio Livro

A Doença do Fabrício - Contos - Artur de Azevedo

Contos - Lima Barreto - Áudio Livro - Audiobook

Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice - AudioBook

Material de apoio para Pais e Professores - Educação Infantil - Nível 1 (crianças entre 4 a 6 anos)

Sala de Aula - Educação Infantil - Nível 2 (crianças entre 5 a 7 anos)

Brincadeira - Educação Infantil - Nível 3 (crianças entre 6 a 8 anos)

Idioma Português - Educação Infantil - Nível 4 (crianças entre 7 a 9 anos)

Rio São Francisco - Educação Infantil - Nível 5 (crianças entre 8 a 10 anos)

Livros - Educação Infantil - Nível 6 (crianças entre 9 a 11 anos)

MISS DOLLAR - Machado de Assis

Quincas Borba - Machado de Assis

Crisálidas - Poesia - Machado de Assis

TU SERÁS FELIZ, BENTINHO - Dom Casmurro

O ALIENISTA - Papéis Avulsos

EMBARGOS DE TERCEIRO - A Mão e a Luva

Tu, só tu, puro amor - Teatro - Machado de Assis

Cartas Fluminenses - Crônica - Machado de Assis

Helena - Machado de Assis

JOGO PERIGOSO - Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas - Machado de Assis

MELHOR DE DESCER QUE DE SUBIR - Esaú e Jacó - Machado de Assis


No hay comentarios.:

Publicar un comentario